HOUSEHOLD PREPARATION

26 Weeks to Family Emergency Preparedness
Below is a document prepared by the Provincial Emergency Program on little things you can do each week for 26 weeks in order to ensure your household is fully prepared in case a disaster happens. Sometimes it's a bit overwhelming for us to prepare an entire emergency plan all at once, so breaking it up into smaller tasks over a longer period of time makes the process easier!

Download: 26 Weeks to Family Emergency Preparedness PDF

Download: 26 Weeks to Pet Emergency Preparedness PDF

Below is a lighthearted video that illustrates the 10 steps to household emergency preparedness planning.  This video comes to us by way of Vancouver Emergency Social Services:

If you like this video or want to comment on it, click on this link to go directly to YouTube.

Dean Karalekas is an amateur videographer, JIBC student and volunteer with the Vancouver ESS program. As part of his JIBC studies, Dean put together this video which covers many of the emergency preparedness principles they try to get out to the public in a very different way.

 

Find out:

  • If you use a kennel, find out what their emergency plan is (in case you're out of town).

  • Really educate yourself on any medications your animals take.

  • Find out in your local community what resources are available for pets and animals during emergencies, so you know what group to contact if something happens. 

  • A good idea if you're going to be away, and your area might be in danger, is to preregister your information with the local emergency animal rescue group in your area, so they know to go ahead and assist your animals if something happens.

  • Kennels and hobby farmers should set up mutual aid agreements with similar type properties, so they can help out each other during disasters. Visit each other's locations, learn your way around (where the keys are, where the water is, etc.).

  • It is always a good idea for people with larger animals, farmers in particular, to consider removing animals from the area during the evacuation alert stage. Sometimes when an order to evacuate comes in there is not enough time to get the animals out safely.